Unusual Sewing Space: Yurt
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Unusual Sewing Space: Yurt

Now that I’ve finally finished organising my sewing space, I thought I’d give you a tour! The unique challenges with a yurt are mostly it’s round walls made of a wooden frame and cloth, and the limited space. Plus it is one big room – I can’t make a mess and the just shut the door behind me. When it comes to sewing as a hobby, I think the challenge is that there are all these different parts of the sewing process that have their own requirements in terms of space and equipment. You need a place to sew, a place to iron and a place to cut fabric. And if you’re a designer, you also need a working desk and a place to draft patterns. Then there’s storage: for fabric, for patterns, for tools, haberdashery and works in progress, maybe even multiple machines. With the space I have I think I’ve pushed it to the limit, not feeling crowded when I sit at my desk and still being able to perform all these tasks. Enjoy the tour!

Unusual Sewing Space: Yurt
Unusual Sewing Space: Yurt

I ‘won’ the best space in the yurt, next to the window because I need the light more. It’s the first time I’ve ever had a dedicated sewing space, and I absolutely love it! My desk is half bought, half made by me. It’s basically just two cabinets with a table top on top. I bought the first cabinet, and then figured that I could make it myself for half the price, so that’s what I did for the other one. The table top is one from IKEA, a light colour so I can also use it to shoot a tutorial if needed. It’s not bolted together, the table top is quite heavy so it doesn’t move. The cabinets give me a lot of storage: 6 boxes hold fabric, one is for patterns and one is for my serger.

Unusual Sewing Space: Yurt

The cabinets with drawers I bought, the board on top I made to measure. I rounded the long sides so it follows the curve of the yurt and provides more ‘breathing space’ right in front of me when I work. The cabinets hold various small things: zippers, buttons, bias tape, needles, stationary and other craft stuff. On top is the stuff I use most, for easy access: pens, rulers, seam allowance guide and such. And a little stack of my favourite sewing books, as an easy resource but also as a reminder that I should do some more pattern magic.

Unusual Sewing Space: Yurt
Unusual Sewing Space: Yurt

The thread rack and the inspiration board I made myself too. I can easily find the colour thread I need, the scissors are always close to hand and it frees up a lot of drawer space. Plus I love how it looks! Because I can’t nail anything to the walls, they hang from little hooks screwed to the back. I’ve always wanted a thread rack, and this one is so convenient because it also holds serger thread. I made it by simply drilling holes in a board at an angle, gluing the wooden pins in and then painting it white. The other board I made to hang stuff on the wall without drilling holes in the yurt frame. The iron stand is super convenient (IKEA again) and I can easily grab a pair of scissors. I was so excited when I found the diamond shaped cork board, it mimics the shape of the wooden yurt frame and now I have a project board too.

Unusual Sewing Space: Yurt
Unusual Sewing Space: Yurt

My machine is stored under the top board when I’m working on my computer. When I need to sew I just slide it out and turn it on, it’s always plugged in. I have enough space to sew like this. My iron sits on the board when I’m using it. The little ironing board is very handy, I just have it standing next to me on the floor. When I’m sewing and I need to press a seam, I just put it on the desk, then put it on the floor again when I’m done. I like not having to get up and iron somewhere else. I also prefer to be closer to the fabric when I iron, too, I can just see better what’s going on.

Unusual Sewing Space: Yurt

Another thing I made is this WIP hanger. It’s just a piece of wood with a hook screwed to it, made in such a way that it fits into the frame without nails or screws. I also hang my ironing board here when I’m not sewing. The only thing I don’t have is a nice big table to cut fabric on. Pattern drafting works but is not ideal, so I mostly use a table in the house for those things. I tend to cut or draft multiple projects at once so I’m not running back and forth between the house and the yurt, good enough for now. I could use Stef’s desk if need be, too. So I hope you liked this peak into my sewing space! If you look closely you can see my ‘box of shame’ under the desk, too. And needless to say it’s rarely this neat, I usually have some WIP’s lying around, samples or knitting projects or just random junk. I try to keep it somewhat neat though, since we have to look at it all the time.

I’m hoping to make a series of Unusual Sewing Spaces, so if you have one that you’d like to share or know someone, please let me know!

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8 Comments

  1. its great how you have made this fit your environment and yet not have to compromise too much. I love your WIP hanger and how it slots into the frame of the yurt – how you stop it flipping out when you have stuff in it? does it extend behind the struts of the yurt? I could do with a thread board like yours too!

    1. Yes, it extends behind the frame. The hook keeps it from sliding down, the weight of the stuff on it keeps it from sliding backward.

  2. I always love seeing your Yurt pictures and it was especially nice to see some detail of your sewing space. There is always a push to live in bigger houses, have more space which is just not sustainable so it’s really inspiring to see people like you living in different ways and getting creative with the space that they have.

    1. Thanks Helen! I feel really comfortable in small spaces, and now that I’ve experienced what it’s like to live with less stuff, I don’t think I want to go back! More space for sewing would be nice though, I’m not sure one should save on creative outlets.

  3. What do you do with the sewing scraps? It’s a constant dilemma of mine. I like to save them for smaller projects but my scrap bags are getting really out of hand!

    1. I save only the ones from fabric I really like. I have two bags and I don’t store them in the yurt… I think they need sorting too, I rarely make things from them!

  4. This is a really lovely and useful space! I love all the places you found to mimic the shape of your yurt, super nicely done!
    Seeing pictures of your yurt in general is very inspiring, thanks for sharing!

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